Get your buzz on.

February 6, 2011

NYC Beekeeper Ezra Hug

Urban beekeeping is in.

After serving as an “apprentice” to NYC beekeeper Ezra Hug last year, I am thrilled to manage my first hive this spring.  Interested?  Take a course with The NYC Beekeepers Association.

The NYCBA is offering a course in 2011 for the absolute beginner and novice beekeeper.  This course is 12 hours long, spread out over four Sundays, AND it offers an apiary visit in April.  The NYCBA volunteer instructors are professional beekeepers with a collective half century of buzz-worthy experience.  The fee is $150.00 for the entire course which includes the following:

* construction of a bee hive
* safe hive placement
* general maintenance
* troubleshooting in the hive
* processes and lifecycle within the colony
* diseases and treatments

Beyond the fact that beekeeping is a HUGE conversation-starter (great for first dates + business interviews), you will also learn how to invigorate your vegetables while contributing to the environment and ensuring yourself as much as 120 lbs of pure raw honey per year per hive.  Yum.

This course teaches everything you need to know to start or continue your fascinating love story with the bees.  Learn about this fulfilling and rewarding hobby.  Become a beekeeper.  It is easier than you may think, and more intriguing that you might imagine.

I’d love to hear from you if you take the course!

Nibble on this

January 22, 2010

As a prelude to an upcoming post on Seth Godin, chomp on this cheese.  Digest.  Like the mouse, you can’t regurgitate this stuff.

If our young men miscarry in their first enterprises, they lose all heart.  If the young merchant fails, men say he is ruined.  If the finest genius studies at one of our colleges, and is not installed in an office within one year afterwards in the cities or suburbs of Boston or New York, it seems to his friends and to himself that he is right in being disheartened, and in complaining the rest of his life.  A sturdy lad from New Hampshire or Vermont, who in turn tries all the professions, who teams it, farms it, peddles, keeps a school, preaches, edits a newspaper, goes to Congress, buys a township, and so forth, in successive years, and always, like a cat, falls on his feet, is worth a hundred of these city dolls.  He walks abreast with his days, and feels no shame in not “studying a profession,” for he does not postpone his life, but lives already.  He has not one chance, but a hundred chances.

-Ralph Waldo Emerson

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